Grand Boulevard Hotel, Manila 

The Grand Boulevard Hotel along the Roxas Boulevard seafront in Manila has stood vacant for many years. The site has been burdened with complex litigation. 
 
Prior to its present name, it was known as Silahis Hotel. It was designed by architect Lor Calma for the annual meeting of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank in 1976. After the Edsa People Power of 1986 toppled the Marcos’ regime, one of the first orders of business of the newly installed government of President Corazon Aquino was the recovery of so-called “ill-gotten wealth” not just by the Marcoses, but also by their relatives, friends, and business associates, or cronies.  
 
The Silahis Hotel was owned by the Enriquez-Panlilio family, and they were part of the inner circles of Marcos. The operators of the hotel and ownerships of the site changed several times, at one point the site was auctioned off. 
 
Time for a bold concept.  
The proposal envisages a complete overhaul of the existing building with a new cast concrete facade, in a light grey appearance. Facing the boulevard, a newly created tower would project fourteen storeys over the existing hotel building, in a dark-grey concrete finish, cantilevering partially over the existing hotel roof top.  
 
The lower, existing building would be refurbished and remain a hotel, the tower would become home to co-working spaces, shops, gyms, swimming pool, indoor sports facilities, workshops, exhibition spaces and conference facilities on the lower floors, and apartments on the upper floors. A glazed atrium featuring a restaurant and lounge connects the two building shapes between the roof garden and the cantilever tower. A lush landscape crowns the roof top of the lower building. 
 
The rooftop of the tower features a swimming pool and outdoor bar, partially covered by a canopy of solar panels. 
The striking, matt appearance of the building connects to the formidable Brutalist heritage of Manila and forms a new intriguing landmark along the skyline at the seafront. 

Grand Boulevard Hotel, Manila 

The Grand Boulevard Hotel along the Roxas Boulevard seafront in Manila has stood vacant for many years. The site has been burdened with complex litigation. 
 
Prior to its present name, it was known as Silahis Hotel. It was designed by architect Lor Calma for the annual meeting of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank in 1976. After the Edsa People Power of 1986 toppled the Marcos’ regime, one of the first orders of business of the newly installed government of President Corazon Aquino was the recovery of so-called “ill-gotten wealth” not just by the Marcoses, but also by their relatives, friends, and business associates, or cronies.  
 
The Silahis Hotel was owned by the Enriquez-Panlilio family, and they were part of the inner circles of Marcos. The operators of the hotel and ownerships of the site changed several times, at one point the site was auctioned off. 
 
Time for a bold concept.  
The proposal envisages a complete overhaul of the existing building with a new cast concrete facade, in a light grey appearance. Facing the boulevard, a newly created tower would project fourteen storeys over the existing hotel building, in a dark-grey concrete finish, cantilevering partially over the existing hotel roof top.  
 
The lower, existing building would be refurbished and remain a hotel, the tower would become home to co-working spaces, shops, gyms, swimming pool, indoor sports facilities, workshops, exhibition spaces and conference facilities on the lower floors, and apartments on the upper floors. A glazed atrium featuring a restaurant and lounge connects the two building shapes between the roof garden and the cantilever tower. A lush landscape crowns the roof top of the lower building. 
 
The rooftop of the tower features a swimming pool and outdoor bar, partially covered by a canopy of solar panels. 
The striking, matt appearance of the building connects to the formidable Brutalist heritage of Manila and forms a new intriguing landmark along the skyline at the seafront. 
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