Hawley Farm House, Hawley 

Many years ago, a fire destroyed all but the brick masonry walls of the historic farm house. The roof is missing, all timber elements are burnt down or heavily charred. The building has been decaying since, whilst nature is reclaiming the generous grounds around the building.  
 
Despite the apparent damage to this heritage asset, the conservation team required the retention and reinstating of the farm house, which is a locally Listed Building. To shoulder the cost of the refurbishment, it was agreed to provide two further dwellings to the rear of the site, acting as enabling development.  
 
The farmhouse itself would be freed of the shackles of the unshapely and disproportionate ground floor additions to the original building. A new, classic modern side extension would redirect the internal viewpoints towards the private garden to the front and side, close to the farmhouse.  
 
The two, new buildings follow the materiality of the farmhouse but interpret this opportunity with a contemporary response, set over two floors. The upper floor, providing the bedrooms, is to be wrapped in dark cladding boards, a nod to stable and storage buildings typically found around traditional farm houses, yet the upper half of the building hovers over an L-shape, red brick ground floor, in reference to the farmhouse appearance.  
 
Large glazed areas in the main living spaces on the ground floor can be fully opened, extending the interior spaces to patios on either side of the two storey portion, and allowing full visual and physical connection between front and rear gardens. The positioning of the new buildings away from the dense boundary vegetation allow great levels of privacy and outlook into nature. The carefully arranged glazed elements connect to the surrounding nature and allow high levels of daylight and sunlight on all rooms and on all floors. 

Hawley Farm House, Hawley 

Many years ago, a fire destroyed all but the brick masonry walls of the historic farm house. The roof is missing, all timber elements are burnt down or heavily charred. The building has been decaying since, whilst nature is reclaiming the generous grounds around the building.  
 
Despite the apparent damage to this heritage asset, the conservation team required the retention and reinstating of the farm house, which is a locally Listed Building. To shoulder the cost of the refurbishment, it was agreed to provide two further dwellings to the rear of the site, acting as enabling development.  
 
The farmhouse itself would be freed of the shackles of the unshapely and disproportionate ground floor additions to the original building. A new, classic modern side extension would redirect the internal viewpoints towards the private garden to the front and side, close to the farmhouse.  
 
The two, new buildings follow the materiality of the farmhouse but interpret this opportunity with a contemporary response, set over two floors. The upper floor, providing the bedrooms, is to be wrapped in dark cladding boards, a nod to stable and storage buildings typically found around traditional farm houses, yet the upper half of the building hovers over an L-shape, red brick ground floor, in reference to the farmhouse appearance.  
 
Large glazed areas in the main living spaces on the ground floor can be fully opened, extending the interior spaces to patios on either side of the two storey portion, and allowing full visual and physical connection between front and rear gardens. The positioning of the new buildings away from the dense boundary vegetation allow great levels of privacy and outlook into nature. The carefully arranged glazed elements connect to the surrounding nature and allow high levels of daylight and sunlight on all rooms and on all floors. 
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